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Jim2
01-08-2016, 11:30 PM
I usually try to be very methodical when I do things, but, today one thing led to another. And since I have no shame, let me tell you guys a little story, if you have a few minutes...


I'm building a shelf rack out of solid Maple. Yesterday I was laying out the mortices on the sides, to accept the shelves…


I was using a utility knife to lay it out (instead of a pencil) because the knife gives a nice thin line and it will help the router get a cleaner cut. While I was at it, I was thinking "this might be a mistake, maybe I should use the pencil".. but I went ahead and finished laying it out with the knife anyway.


Then I realized that some of that line will be visible after the shelves are in… DOH! …


So I figured, "ok, I'll just have to start my sanding with 80 grit paper instead of 120, no big deal…"


As I started sanding, I realized that I would have to go kinda deep and, to make a long story short, it would be hard to get the shelves perfect because of the way the joint is configured. … Sanding that much would leave irregularities in the thickness of the board, and it would show in the joint.


So I figured, "dammit, I guess I'll have to get out the planer"… The planer is a heavy lump, buried in back of a closet, but it Will solve the problem. So I dug it out..


When I put the first board thru, I took a shallow cut... but the blades were so damn dull that it made a mess of the whole thing… ugh… worse than before! The grain had some waves in it, and it tore out so bad, I would need to go back to 40 grit paper to fix it..


But the blades are reversible, and I knew the other side is fresh, so I went to flip them…. But that didn't work out so good either…


The 12 bolts that hold the blades are "button heads" with a 4mm allen socket. I've had problems with those little bastards stripping in the past and, sure enough, they stripped again. ... So I shot them down with PB Blaster and finally managed to tap them all loose with a cold chisel… what a pain in the ass!


Then I went to the store and got all new bolts, flipped the blades, and spent about five friggin minutes using the damn planer… Problem solved… But it wound up being a three hour operation…

I hope you guys got a kick out of my story. I'm sure there are millions of "one thing leads to another" stories... Anyone else got one to share?

fenders
01-08-2016, 11:51 PM
I have a nicely equipped woodworking shop. Nice tools don't stop me from cutting miter angles backwards in expensive wood. Have you ever had a strong table saw throw a board at you yet? A piece of oak hitting you in the gut at mach 2 will make you slow down and be more careful.

Jim2
01-09-2016, 12:46 AM
I have a nicely equipped woodworking shop. Nice tools don't stop me from cutting miter angles backwards in expensive wood. Have you ever had a strong table saw throw a board at you yet? A piece of oak hitting you in the gut at mach 2 will make you slow down and be more careful.

heheheh, yeah, I have fenders...

I've been at this for a looong time... it's my trade. and I didn't work in a bicycle shop for a few years in between... I say that because I once worked with a guy who liked to say "I started doing carpentry 25 years ago".... and then, after a few beers, he admitted that he worked at a bicycle shop for a long time in between. He was basically a rookie, but he talked a good line of shit. I'm sure he was great at sales...

But yeah, a kickback took a big divot out of my palm once. It was the only time I ever used crazy glue to close a cut and, I gotta say, it worked great!

I was taught to always stay "out of the line of fire" with a table saw, and I respect that rule. ... even when I first plug it in.. or turn it on..

I've seen my old tablesaw (delta contractors saw) throw a kickback twig about 200 feet... it probably went 100 feet before it lost any altitude... I never put my body in that "line of fire". That would've really hurt!

Jim2
01-09-2016, 12:52 AM
ps Fenders... I got blasted in the eye by a small piece once too. My shades probably saved my eye, but that shit hurt! Even though it was a small square piece, and it mostly hit the glasses, it was a blow to the head!

Jim2
01-09-2016, 12:55 AM
when I'm too old to do this stuff anymore, I'm gonna start a youtube channel called "Don't try this at Home".... Lol...

Jim2
01-09-2016, 01:07 AM
The moral of my story is that I should've used the pencil instead of the knife.

An old timer once told me a thing that sticks with me to this day.

"Better than good enough is bad for the job" - Tony Ippolito

Tony was awesome... I was 19, and he was in his seventies.

I guess, the trick is to know exactly where "good enough" lies... I'm still learning the nuances of that one..

Henry
01-09-2016, 08:34 AM
I usually try to be very methodical when I do things, but, today one thing led to another. And since I have no shame, let me tell you guys a little story, if you have a few minutes...


I'm building a shelf rack out of solid Maple. Yesterday I was laying out the mortices on the sides, to accept the shelves…


I was using a utility knife to lay it out (instead of a pencil) because the knife gives a nice thin line and it will help the router get a cleaner cut. While I was at it, I was thinking "this might be a mistake, maybe I should use the pencil".. but I went ahead and finished laying it out with the knife anyway.


Then I realized that some of that line will be visible after the shelves are in… DOH! …


So I figured, "ok, I'll just have to start my sanding with 80 grit paper instead of 120, no big deal…"


As I started sanding, I realized that I would have to go kinda deep and, to make a long story short, it would be hard to get the shelves perfect because of the way the joint is configured. … Sanding that much would leave irregularities in the thickness of the board, and it would show in the joint.


So I figured, "dammit, I guess I'll have to get out the planer"… The planer is a heavy lump, buried in back of a closet, but it Will solve the problem. So I dug it out..


When I put the first board thru, I took a shallow cut... but the blades were so damn dull that it made a mess of the whole thing… ugh… worse than before! The grain had some waves in it, and it tore out so bad, I would need to go back to 40 grit paper to fix it..


But the blades are reversible, and I knew the other side is fresh, so I went to flip them…. But that didn't work out so good either…


The 12 bolts that hold the blades are "button heads" with a 4mm allen socket. I've had problems with those little bastards stripping in the past and, sure enough, they stripped again. ... So I shot them down with PB Blaster and finally managed to tap them all loose with a cold chisel… what a pain in the ass!


Then I went to the store and got all new bolts, flipped the blades, and spent about five friggin minutes using the damn planer… Problem solved… But it wound up being a three hour operation…

I hope you guys got a kick out of my story. I'm sure there are millions of "one thing leads to another" stories... Anyone else got one to share?

Didn't the plaining make the thickness of the shelf board undersize?

I'm trying to picture what you were doing and are the shelves 1 x 12's and what size is your planer?

I too have done a lot of woodworking over the years and enjoy it.

Henry

fenders
01-09-2016, 09:14 AM
I couldn't quite picture what went wrong with you project either. Sorry you had to type all that. :) I need to get back in the woodshop. I usually build a couple tables or wall clocks each winter. Started playing with curved front tables. Those are a lot of fun once you successfully get the laminated front glued up correctly.

Henry
01-09-2016, 09:40 AM
I couldn't quite picture what went wrong with you project either. Sorry you had to type all that. :) I need to get back in the woodshop. I usually build a couple tables or wall clocks each winter. Started playing with curved front tables. Those are a lot of fun once you successfully get the laminated front glued up correctly.

I can see what he did. Using the knife to make a line rather than the pencil allowed the cut line to show after routering. I understand that part. Just trying to picture how deep he had to plain the board.

Too bad wood has gotten SO expensive. Could have saved this wood for another (shorter project) and bought new wood.

I have no doubt he will succeed, AGAIN.

Henry

fenders
01-09-2016, 09:56 AM
I do too now. I was thinking about the shelf and not the side supports. I normally use my dado blade on the table saw for that operation whenever possible. Love my router and router table but it can blow out a nice board now and then. I see why he used the razor first.

Jim2
01-09-2016, 03:15 PM
Sorry if I wasn't clear guys.. I was trying to be concise..

The shelves are 3-1/2" and the sides are 4-5/8".

It was just a brain fart that led to a whole big operation to fix it. When I realized it, I kept thinking of old Tony saying "Better than good enough is bad for the job". :redface: That phrase is so simple, but it covers so much ground, that it can take a lifetime to really learn it. I should've just used the pencil this time...

Yes Henry, the screwup was on the sides. The mortices are 5/16" deep so, the little bit that I had to remove with the planer will have no real affect on the finished product. I'll post a pic later, that'll be easier than describing it fully.

Fenders, post up some pics of your projects, I'd like to see your bending jigs and such :thumb:

fenders
01-09-2016, 03:44 PM
Sorry if I wasn't clear guys.. I was trying to be concise..

The shelves are 3-1/2" and the sides are 4-5/8".

It was just a brain fart that led to a whole big operation to fix it. When I realized it, I kept thinking of old Tony saying "Better than good enough is bad for the job". :redface: That phrase is so simple, but it covers so much ground, that it can take a lifetime to really learn it. I should've just used the pencil this time...

Yes Henry, the screwup was on the sides. The mortices are 5/16" deep so, the little bit that I had to remove with the planer will have no real affect on the finished product. I'll post a pic later, that'll be easier than describing it fully.

Fenders, post up some pics of your projects, I'd like to see your bending jigs and such :thumb:

I will Jim. I gave a lot of my stuff away as gifts and lost some pic files, But I have a few things I can snap a pic of and post to this thread later. They are nothing super fancy. I consider myself a novice, but people offer to buy the stuff for about as much as the walnut costs so I am making some progress. :)

I bought a 15" planer I need to haul down a flight of steps. You busy tomorrow? :)

Jim2
01-09-2016, 04:12 PM
I will Jim. I gave a lot of my stuff away as gifts and lost some pic files, But I have a few things I can snap a pic of and post to this thread later. They are nothing super fancy. I consider myself a novice, but people offer to buy the stuff for about as much as the walnut costs so I am making some progress. :)

I bought a 15" planer I need to haul down a flight of steps. You busy tomorrow? :)

heheheh, I'll be right over! Good luck with that fenders.. did you get the new DeWalt planer?

I recently downgraded my table saw because my old one was just too hard to move around. The motor was easy to remove, but even then, I could just barely get this thing into my truck by myself. Now I have a more portable DeWalt... folding stand, plastic body, etc. I can carry it around as easily as a suitcase, and it has a 28" rip capacity, but it's not quite as good as my old Delta.

I loved this old Delta, but it was only a matter of time before I wrecked my back trying to move it from job to job. It was great once it was set up though!

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/Mahogany%20Door/IMG_9503_zpsj9wppn8l.jpg

When I was at Lowes' getting the new saw, they had the new version of the Delta "contractor's saw" there too.. It sure was sweet, but even heavier than my old one. At $650, I was seriously considering buying it until I remembered why I was there in the first place..

Jim2
01-09-2016, 04:20 PM
^that^ was a fence and door job that I did a while back.. The door came out pretty nice if I do say so myself. :)


http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/Mahogany%20Door/IMG_9635_zpsh6vvuxwu.jpg

fenders
01-09-2016, 05:36 PM
Nice work Jim! I am moving my shop as we speak and I will provide pics later. Here is the short list of my woodshop toys.

Tablesaw- 10" Craftman Professional with Biesemeyer fence (the $1000 one, nothing special, strong enough to kill me :)
Bandsaw- Rikon 17"
Planer- Grizzly 15"
Router- 3 1/4 HP Porter Cable in a New Yankee Workshop station with nice router lift, assorted handheld PC routers
Chopsaw- Dewalt 12"
Jointer- Craftsman Pro 6"
Morticer-Delta
Lathe- I forget the brand but it is pretty new and I hardly ever use it so far.
A ton of Dewalt and Bosch portable air and electric tools, nailers, sanders and stuff a construction guy would probably own.

Nothing to brag about, but good enough to make bad projects my fault. :)

Henry
01-09-2016, 06:18 PM
^that^ was a fence and door job that I did a while back.. The door came out pretty nice if I do say so myself. :)


http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/Mahogany%20Door/IMG_9635_zpsh6vvuxwu.jpg

That's a nice job and I have 2 questions, please.

What kind of wood is it?

How come the hinges are on the lock side? (sort of makes popping the hinge pins easy).

What am I missing?

You do, do good work.

Henry

Jim2
01-09-2016, 07:02 PM
Nice work Jim! I am moving my shop as we speak and I will provide pics later. Here is the short list of my woodshop toys.

Tablesaw- 10" Craftman Professional with Biesemeyer fence (the $1000 one, nothing special, strong enough to kill me
Bandsaw- Rikon 17"
Planer- Grizzly 15"
Router- 3 1/4 HP Porter Cable in a New Yankee Workshop station with nice router lift, assorted handheld PC routers
Chopsaw- Dewalt 12"
Jointer- Craftsman Pro 6"
Morticer-Delta
Lathe- I forget the brand but it is pretty new and I hardly ever use it so far.
A ton of Dewalt and Bosch portable air and electric tools, nailers, sanders and stuff a construction guy would probably own.

Nothing to brag about, but good enough to make bad projects my fault. :)

heheheh, cheers fenders! :thumb:

That sounds like a pretty good setup you have there though. It's more than I have, but I barely got room for the things that I do have. Some of my stuff has to stay in my truck for lack of space. I love when I can set up shop at a job and leave everything there for a while. It's the only time get to drive my truck around with an empty bed.

My planer is an old 12" Delta. Sometimes I get so pissed with it that I think about selling it cheap, and I almost beat the shit out of it with a hammer yesterday, but it does get the job done. I've had it for a long time, and I certainly got my monies worth out of it, so I guess I can't complain. I already had the rollers replaced once, maybe I should sell it while it still has sharp blades in it...

I used to have a 6" Delta jointer, but that thing was a toy. I sold it for cheap years ago. I think I got $50 for it, and I was glad to see it go. A "sled" on the table saw works better than that thing ever did.

I would love to have a morticer though! I used one once, at a place I worked, and that is an amazing tool! It makes it so easy to cut deep mortices...My old woodshop teacher ("Mr G") was a purist about the "old school" methods of building things, and I love the old joinery myself now too. A good mortice and tenon joint is far superior to any "modern" style construction that involves screws and brackets.

Mr G taught us about how and why wood doesn't get along with metal... He would say; "If you put a nail or screw in it, that will eventually become the weak spot". The reason being that wood and metal move differently, and metal conducts heat better than wood. The transfer of heat (and cold) can cause condensation inside the wood, and eventually creates rot... Not to mention if the metal rusts... That's why nails are better than screws sometimes. Screws have more surface area, and that exacerbates the problem. But I digress....;)

That thing that old Tony Ippolito said, about "better than good enough is bad for the job"... That's the other side of the same coin. In construction, a thing that will last 100 years is certainly "good enough". Shoots, many construction companies only care if it lasts 5 years, or 1 year, or however long the warranty lasts... but something made from "only" wood, can last for millennia if it's cared for.

I've worked for some bosses who don't always like the way I think, but I have some customers who absolutely Love the way I think. I'll be 50 soon, but even when I was 20, I always tried to make the things I build to last longer than me. No doubt, some of them will. Unless the termites find it... ;)

Jim2
01-09-2016, 07:14 PM
That's a nice job and I have 2 questions, please.

What kind of wood is it?

How come the hinges are on the lock side? (sort of makes popping the hinge pins easy).

What am I missing?

You do, do good work.

Henry

Thanks Henry. The wood is African Mahogany with "Cabbots" oil stain for the finish.

About the hinges, the door has to swing out because there's a staircase going down on the other side, and there's no "landing" at the top to allow it to swing in. If the door swung in, you would have to back down the steps to open it. So it was just an ergonomics thing. It's not an "entry door" per se, more of a fancy gate.. the other side is still outside of the house.

PS, The big gap at the bottom is because the pavement outside isn't level. When it's wide open, it almost touches the ground..

fenders
01-09-2016, 07:33 PM
Almost everything I do is mortise and tenon joinery. I'll use my pin nailer to secure things while the glue dries but rarely use a metal fastener. If the old craftsmen could use hide glue I would think modern tech glues will last as long. Like you imply, I will be dead before most of it fails. I've busted up some abandoned projects for the fireplace. It always fails away from the joint. I like the shaker style the Amish practiced, as taught by Norm Abrams. I wore out Norm's VCR tapes from the library. Most of my tools were purchased with the intent to meet his minimum standard. I need an 8" jointer someday. I occasionally waste wood ripping it down to 6" for my baby jointer.

My shop is in the basement as my cars dominate the garage. My wife hates it but i can't hear her bitch when the router is running lol. I do need better dust collection. I have a Delta 1/1/2HP dust collector that sorta gets it done. My new shop room is only about 28x17 so I will have to set up efficiently. It almost 50% bigger than I had before though. Most everything on wheels so I can move a tool when I need to for big material.

Jim2
01-09-2016, 08:47 PM
Almost everything I do is mortise and tenon joinery. I'll use my pin nailer to secure things while the glue dries but rarely use a metal fastener. If the old craftsmen could use hide glue I would think modern tech glues will last as long. Like you imply, I will be dead before most of it fails. I've busted up some abandoned projects for the fireplace. It always fails away from the joint. I like the shaker style the Amish practiced, as taught by Norm Abrams. I wore out Norm's VCR tapes from the library. Most of my tools were purchased with the intent to meet his minimum standard. I need an 8" jointer someday. I occasionally waste wood ripping it down to 6" for my baby jointer.

My shop is in the basement as my cars dominate the garage. My wife hates it but i can't hear her bitch when the router is running lol. I do need better dust collection. I have a Delta 1/1/2HP dust collector that sorta gets it done. My new shop room is only about 28x17 so I will have to set up efficiently. It almost 50% bigger than I had before though. Most everything on wheels so I can move a tool when I need to for big material.

heheheh, that crack about your wife made me chuckle fenders :thumb: ... But there's a few other things there too.

About "the old craftsmen", there's no doubt in my mind that they would've used the the things we have, if they had them.. When people say "they don't make em like they used to..." I would agree.. They don't make em like they used to, they make em BETTER! - Imo, it's not fair to compare a modern p.o.s. mass produced item to an antique. That's basically "apples and oranges".. To compare apples to apples, you would have to compare an antique to a new, well made, item. I would say the new item is better. But, some of the old-time craftsmanship is hard to find these days. The skill in the hands has been replaced by the accuracy of machines. Nowadays, you can have a guy making $8/hr planing boards faster and more precisely than an old master could ever have done it. Time marches on... But when I see some old carved stuff, I'm always blown away. Machines are only good for cutting straight lines..

About the jointer, have you ever seen a sled for the planer? It's basically a jig that you can make for yourself... You put a twisted board on it, with some shims to hold it stable, and you'll be able to "unwind" a 15" wide board with your new planer. Jigs are great but, if it's only one or two pieces, sometimes it's faster to just do it by hand rather than building a jig. I assume you have a hand plane, are you familiar with "winding sticks"?

About wheels... the new Delta "contractors saw" has a slick three wheel system for moving it around. It wouldn't work for what I do, because I have to cross lawns and go down steps etc, but it looks like it would work great on a concrete slab. In that pic I posted earlier, you can see the skidpad I made for my old saw so that I could drag it into the corner at the end of each day without tearing up the guy's garage floor. It was a wood floor, and the cheap little plastic feet for that saw were looooong gone..

And finally, Norm! I like Norm, but his show strikes me as one big tool advertisement. Maybe I'm just jealous :) But really, I have a lot of respect for Norm. He knows what's up.. but he's a salesman too. I remember when he was still Bob Vila's underling.. Bob Vila was a friggin idiot! I'm glad Norm finally got his own show. ...Did you ever see "The Woodwright's Shop"? I love this guy. He cuts his finger but the show goes on! And then he jokes about it later... I love the way he respects the wood too, and the way he does everything without electricity. http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/home/

My old woodshop teacher, "Mr G", has retired and now he builds stuff at his home. From what I hear, he's taken up rock climbing too... "Mr G" was one of the coolest teachers in school, and I'm proud to say that he was my teacher. Nowadays, his stuff winds up in galleries and art shows... check out some of the stuff in his "gallery" on this website. Mr G doesn't cut anything with a straight line. It's all "usable art".. http://www.guarinofurnituredesigns.com/

fenders
01-09-2016, 09:25 PM
heheheh, that crack about your wife made me chuckle fenders :thumb: ... But there's a few other things there too.

About "the old craftsmen", there's no doubt in my mind that they would've used the the things we have, if they had them.. When people say "they don't make em like they used to..." I would agree.. They don't make em like they used to, they make em BETTER! - Imo, it's not fair to compare a modern p.o.s. mass produced item to an antique. That's basically "apples and oranges".. To compare apples to apples, you would have to compare an antique to a new, well made, item. I would say the new item is better. But, some of the old-time craftsmanship is hard to find these days. The skill in the hands has been replaced by the accuracy of machines. Nowadays, you can have a guy making $8/hr planing boards faster and more precisely than an old master could ever have done it. Time marches on... But when I see some old carved stuff, I'm always blown away. Machines are only good for cutting straight lines..

About the jointer, have you ever seen a sled for the planer? It's basically a jig that you can make for yourself... You put a twisted board on it, with some shims to hold it stable, and you'll be able to "unwind" a 15" wide board with your new planer. Jigs are great but, if it's only one or two pieces, sometimes it's faster to just do it by hand rather than building a jig. I assume you have a hand plane, are you familiar with "winding sticks"?

About wheels... the new Delta "contractors saw" has a slick three wheel system for moving it around. It wouldn't work for what I do, because I have to cross lawns and go down steps etc, but it looks like it would work great on a concrete slab. In that pic I posted earlier, you can see the skidpad I made for my old saw so that I could drag it into the corner at the end of each day without tearing up the guy's garage floor. It was a wood floor, and the cheap little plastic feet for that saw were looooong gone..

And finally, Norm! I like Norm, but his show strikes me as one big tool advertisement. Maybe I'm just jealous :) But really, I have a lot of respect for Norm. He knows what's up.. but he's a salesman too. I remember when he was still Bob Vila's underling.. Bob Vila was a friggin idiot! I'm glad Norm finally got his own show. ...Did you ever see "The Woodwright's Shop"? I love this guy. He cuts his finger but the show goes on! And then he jokes about it later... I love the way he respects the wood too, and the way he does everything without electricity. http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/home/

My old woodshop teacher, "Mr G", has retired and now he builds stuff at his home. From what I hear, he's taken up rock climbing too... "Mr G" was one of the coolest teachers in school, and I'm proud to say that he was my teacher. Nowadays, his stuff winds up in galleries and art shows... check out some of the stuff in his "gallery" on this website. Mr G doesn't cut anything with a straight line. It's all "usable art".. http://www.guarinofurnituredesigns.com/

Norm definitely sold me a few tools lol. He was on the air forever on pubic television so just glad he stayed in business somehow. I don't do a lot of curves. The bent laminations allow me to create the illusion I am an artist instead of the machinist. I'd like to try some inlays. Both my girls are artsy and could help me with something custom to inlay. I do watch the Woodwright. Roy is a nut. I love it when he starts in with the deep zen thoughts. I don't do much with my hand planes yet. I need to build a sled for my planer. I checked out your link and Mr G. is an artist. That stuff is not even on my dream list. :)

Jim2
01-09-2016, 10:01 PM
... Mr G. is an artist. That stuff is not even on my dream list. :)

Yeah, he's one of my heros fenders.. :thumb:

Back in high school days, I made a rack for my Father's shotgun... It didn't exactly come out the way I planned it. It wound up being "one thing leads to another", and I wound up chasing the grain of the wood in an attempt to get it sanded smooth. In the end, I had to just finish it because the year was almost over. Some places never got finished sanding, and the shape came out a little funky because I was trying too hard to make it perfect... When "the deadline" came, I was a little disappointed with the whole thing, but Mr G gave me an A anyway ...

...it still hangs on the wall at my Mom's to this day... Still "good as new", 30+ years later.



http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/699f43ae-056e-481c-946e-e5f72a40bf3b_zpsocxhycrc.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/Shotgun%20rack_zpsacoossha.jpg

Jim2
01-09-2016, 11:02 PM
here's a pic of the rack....

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/20160109_172132_zpszjs5lwkt.jpg

Jim2
01-09-2016, 11:14 PM
... this pic show the little screws that have pissed me off so many times over the years..

In the past, I was able to get them loose by taking a piece of rebar and "peening" the head, in order to get a better grip with the allen wrench. It pissed me off every time.. (PB Blaster always helps too)

If you look close, you can see where some of the heads are flattened on top.... And it's pretty easy to see the marks from the cold chisel that I had to use to beat them loose this time. This the second time I had to do this maneuver, and it also pisses me off every time. I look forward to selling this tool...
..

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/20160109_172927_zps1wvvtsef.jpg

Jim2
01-19-2016, 11:52 PM
http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/20160119_104310_zpsmq2kykrk.jpg


http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/20160119_131442_zpsnzbnri4h.jpg

Henry
01-20-2016, 08:55 AM
http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/20160119_104310_zpsmq2kykrk.jpg


http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g267/jimguitars/20160119_131442_zpsnzbnri4h.jpg

WOW again! What a professional job.

I had no idea what you were building was as big as it is.

You're good Jim2, you're good.

Henry

Jim2
01-20-2016, 06:28 PM
Thanks Henry :thumb: