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tommie.b
10-17-2015, 06:42 AM
Hi all just bought 4 Coker classic wide whitewalls for my car and the sales man said use soap and water to clean them. Well doesn't get the brake dust off. Any ideas and what are you guys using. The old comet or cleaners will bleed the black out and into the white according to them. Thanks

Len
10-17-2015, 07:12 AM
Hi all just bought 4 Coker classic wide whitewalls for my car and the sales man said use soap and water to clean them. Well doesn't get the brake dust off. Any ideas and what are you guys using. The old comet or cleaners will bleed the black out and into the white according to them. Thanks

We use a stiff brush and Mother's Wheel and Tire Cleaner or Super Clean available at most automotive stores and big box stores. However, it will depend on how deep the contamination goes, you may need to attack it with some SOS.

Sid
10-17-2015, 10:07 AM
I always used Westleys should be able to find it at most automotive stores, or Napa white wall cleaner avalible at your local Napa.

tommie.b
10-17-2015, 01:04 PM
Sid I have always used Westlys for years but it has bleech in it and tire people say DO NOT USE it. Who Knows.

Henry
10-17-2015, 03:45 PM
Sid I have always used Westlys for years but it has bleech in it and tire people say DO NOT USE it. Who Knows.

NO, not ONE drop of bleach in BLECHE WITE. That's why it's never been spelled like bleach.

It's been around for a few decades and Wesley's first made it and chose the name when whitewall tires were on most every car on the roads. The name relates to getting white shirts and clothing "BLEACH" white, as would be used to bleach material white.

You no longer can purchase Wesley's Bleche White as the product was bought several years ago by Black Magic and they are trying to bill it as a tire cleaner.

Reports and complaints were lodged that Black Magic cut the strength of it but today, the product is as it was IMO.

I use it for any part of a vehicle and have for years. Spray if dry on a weathered car that sat under trees or in a field and turned green with mold, as see what this stuff can really do. Try it on interiors on stains (sprayed, then brushed NO WATER yet) and you'll be amazed.

Spray it on your tires dry, then use a wet brush to work it in. Don't let it dry before you brush it in and not in the sun.

I was told the active ingredient is peroxide.

Henry

tommie.b
10-17-2015, 06:28 PM
oh ok I am calling Coker tire Monday and will ask them what they recommend. will report back

SStampede
10-17-2015, 07:02 PM
NO, not ONE drop of bleach in BLECHE WITE. That's why it's never been spelled like bleach.

It's been around for a few decades and Wesley's first made it and chose the name when whitewall tires were on most every car on the roads. The name relates to getting white shirts and clothing "BLEACH" white, as would be used to bleach material white.

You no longer can purchase Wesley's Bleche White as the product was bought several years ago by Black Magic and they are trying to bill it as a tire cleaner.

Reports and complaints were lodged that Black Magic cut the strength of it but today, the product is as it was IMO.

I use it for any part of a vehicle and have for years. Spray if dry on a weathered car that sat under trees or in a field and turned green with mold, as see what this stuff can really do. Try it on interiors on stains (sprayed, then brushed NO WATER yet) and you'll be amazed.

Spray it on your tires dry, then use a wet brush to work it in. Don't let it dry before you brush it in and not in the sun.

I was told the active ingredient is peroxide.

Henry

Listen to his statement, I did, it works like a dream!

Thanks.

tommie.b
10-18-2015, 11:06 AM
Listen to his statement, I did, it works like a dream!

Thanks.

yes I have used Westleys for years and love it ..............But the tire co who I bought them from made a point about they have problems with the black or brownsish bleeding thru in to the white from using and type of harsh cleaners such as Westeys or comet and SOS pads so I asked him what do I do? his statement was use soap and water only!
I am with u you guy Westleys for me

Henry
10-18-2015, 02:02 PM
yes I have used Westleys for years and love it ..............But the tire co who I bought them from made a point about they have problems with the black or brownsish bleeding thru in to the white from using and type of harsh cleaners such as Westeys or comet and SOS pads so I asked him what do I do? his statement was use soap and water only!
I am with u you guy Westleys for me

Say what?

I have to use caution on what I say because I don't know what or how your tires differ from those on the road today. That being said, unless Coker can explain what the difference might be, I'll submit the following:

You said, they said: "..............But the tire co who I bought them from made a point about they have problems with the black or brownsish bleeding thru in to the white"

Walk through any parking lot looking at the dirty tires of any make on any car, in the sun would be good and notice the golden brown color on all the black. This collection of dirt, road grime and stained rubber is WHY we clean tires. That color is already there BEFORE we clean. Spray the tire with a tire cleaner, hopefully Bleche Wite, away from the sun and dry, then scrub with a wet brush and watch the nasty colors wash away.

I can't figure out what this guy is talking about and bet a coffee, he can't either.

Comet & SOS DO NOT belong on tires you care about. On a whitewall, SOS will only serve to scuff the dirt off and Comet, about the same thing. These are 2 things that some used back in the 50's to clean whitewall tires but even back then, there was LESTOIL which worked great on getting tires clean for the white and the black.

Why would anyone want to scratch the rubber of a whitewall with an SOS when a simple spray, a brush and water will more than do the job? Ask this genius that when you speak with them.

Henry

tommie.b
10-18-2015, 02:41 PM
Thanks Henry I will let you know what Coker tire says

Sid
10-20-2015, 06:46 PM
I looked on the Coker web site and noticed they have a white wall cleaner they sell, might make it hard for them to sell if you will can buy something local that will do the same job.

TOGWT
10-25-2015, 06:12 AM
Whitewall Tyres

Nearly all American Classic tyre are whitewalls, so purchasing a high-quality whitewall cleaner is suggested. Never use chemical or bleach cleaners, if you’re having a tough time removing stains from the whitewall with cleaners, S.O.S. or Brillo pads will help and 400-grit sandpaper (sanded with water) can be used as a last resort (do not use an abrasive method like this on a regular basis). Without a doubt, frequent cleaning is best for keeping whitewalls in optimal condition. Here’s a quick rundown of the cleaning process:

1. Pre-soak the tyre
2. Clean off loose debris
3. Apply cleaning agent
4. Scrub with a med stiff brush
5. Rinse
6. Repeat until clean

1. Use a wet, medium grit 3M™ Flexible Sanding Sponge, or SC Johnson Brillo® Soap Pads, which combine fine steel wool with a powerful pink soap; do not use an abrasive method like this on a regular basis

2. Wesley’s Bleche-Wite® Whitewall Cleaner - this product doesn’t contain bleach (despite its name) but uses optical brighteners; they're added to make the white wall of a tyre appear brighter and whiter than it really is. These agents absorb ultraviolet light and emit it back as visible blue light.
It is formulated with Butyl Cellosolve (2-butoxyethanol) Sodium Met silicate, which are highly alkaline, none of which are particularly paint, rubber, polymer or human friendly. It will stain and / or etch clear coat painted wheels and zinc rotors as well as drying out tyres and with constant use turn them grey. Be very cautious of overspray

3. (USA) Antique white wall tyres – Coker Tyres Wide White Whitewall Tire Cleaner

4. (UK) Race Glaze Whitewall Tyre Cleaner - the dual action formula first cleans the dirt and road film from the tyre, then goes on to penetrate the pores of the white rubber, releasing any ground in dirt or grime. Cleans evenly, removing stains and kerb gouge debris, leaving a bright white satin finish. Just spray, agitate and rinse

5. (US/UK) Dr Beasley's Tyre Conditioner - water based formula - contains no solvents which can damage rubber and contains UV blockers and moisturizers that prevent your tires from cracking, fading, and drying out. Not only does it restore your tires back to health, but you can adjust the level of gloss you prefer simply by wiping after application.

tommie.b
10-25-2015, 06:46 AM
Great Info thanks

Henry
10-25-2015, 06:48 AM
Whitewall Tyres

Nearly all American Classic tyre are whitewalls, so purchasing a high-quality whitewall cleaner is suggested. Never use chemical or bleach cleaners, if you’re having a tough time removing stains from the whitewall with cleaners, S.O.S. or Brillo pads will help and 400-grit sandpaper (sanded with water) can be used as a last resort (do not use an abrasive method like this on a regular basis). Without a doubt, frequent cleaning is best for keeping whitewalls in optimal condition. Here’s a quick rundown of the cleaning process:

1. Pre-soak the tyre
2. Clean off loose debris
3. Apply cleaning agent
4. Scrub with a med stiff brush
5. Rinse
6. Repeat until clean

1. Use a wet, medium grit 3M™ Flexible Sanding Sponge, or SC Johnson Brillo® Soap Pads, which combine fine steel wool with a powerful pink soap; do not use an abrasive method like this on a regular basis

2. Wesley’s Bleche-Wite® Whitewall Cleaner - this product doesn’t contain bleach (despite its name) but uses optical brighteners; they're added to make the white wall of a tyre appear brighter and whiter than it really is. These agents absorb ultraviolet light and emit it back as visible blue light.
It is formulated with Butyl Cellosolve (2-butoxyethanol) Sodium Met silicate, which are highly alkaline, none of which are particularly paint, rubber, polymer or human friendly. It will stain and / or etch clear coat painted wheels and zinc rotors as well as drying out tyres and with constant use turn them grey. Be very cautious of overspray 3. (USA) Antique white wall tyres – Coker Tyres Wide White Whitewall Tire Cleaner

4. (UK) Race Glaze Whitewall Tyre Cleaner - the dual action formula first cleans the dirt and road film from the tyre, then goes on to penetrate the pores of the white rubber, releasing any ground in dirt or grime. Cleans evenly, removing stains and kerb gouge debris, leaving a bright white satin finish. Just spray, agitate and rinse

5. (US/UK) Dr Beasley's Tyre Conditioner - water based formula - contains no solvents which can damage rubber and contains UV blockers and moisturizers that prevent your tires from cracking, fading, and drying out. Not only does it restore your tires back to health, but you can adjust the level of gloss you prefer simply by wiping after application.

Let me say this about that: "2. Wesley’s Bleche-Wite® Whitewall Cleaner - this product doesn’t contain bleach (despite its name) but uses optical brighteners; they're added to make the white wall of a tyre appear brighter and whiter than it really is. These agents absorb ultraviolet light and emit it back as visible blue light.
It is formulated with Butyl Cellosolve (2-butoxyethanol) Sodium Met silicate, which are highly alkaline, none of which are particularly paint, rubber, polymer or human friendly. It will stain and / or etch clear coat painted wheels and zinc rotors as well as drying out tyres and with constant use turn them grey. Be very cautious of overspray 3. (USA) Antique white wall tyres – Coker Tyres Wide White Whitewall Tire Cleaner "

Are your adverse claims from your experience or something you read? I think you have assumed facts not in evidence weighed against my 35 years (and other people) using the product.

I use it on tires, stained auto body paint, cloth interiors of velour and other materials with positive results of superior cleaning. I have NEVER seen this stuff work adversely or harm anything I've put it on. OF COURSE, I've never sprayed and worked it into a surface that I did not rinse, wash or neutralize after its use and maybe that's the key.

You keep reading and I'll keep doing because it has never failed me.

Henry