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Reliabilityman
01-01-2014, 10:02 AM
After your done with a job what do you do to prepare them for storage for both a wool and foam pad? I thought I would simply store them in a plastic bag to keep them clean until next time but since they are still damp I thought they might get moldy funky or something . Do you rince the compound off them at all?

Len
01-01-2014, 04:25 PM
After your done with a job what do you do to prepare them for storage for both a wool and foam pad? I thought I would simply store them in a plastic bag to keep them clean until next time but since they are still damp I thought they might get moldy funky or something . Do you rince the compound off them at all?

I normally spur them to remove excess polish then allow them to dry and I store them in a box. I use mostly foam these days so after they get worn I usually toss them, when I was using more wool I'd throw them in the washing machine and drier then to the box.

Reliabilityman
01-01-2014, 10:17 PM
Thanks Len

Phil V
01-02-2014, 10:38 AM
What I do is while the pad is still on the buffer I turn the speed of the buffer all the way up then blow the pad off with compressed air. That cleans off all the old compound, dries the pad if damp then I stick the pad in a large zip lock food bag to keep it clean. There is no right way or wrong way, it's whatever works for you.

gtome
01-07-2014, 09:47 PM
I use a Ziplock as well.

Len
01-08-2014, 06:27 AM
I use a Ziplock as well.

I tried putting them in plastic bags but, since I wasn't buffing daily, I found that they were getting moldy so I switched to boxes.

LS6
01-08-2014, 09:35 PM
I tried putting them in plastic bags but, since I wasn't buffing daily, I found that they were getting moldy so I switched to boxes.

How about if you wash them by hand, squeeze them dry with a few paper towels, then allow them to dry flat for 2 or 3 days. When they are fully dry, just place them into freezer bags. I've done it quite a few times and never had a problem.
LS6

Len
01-08-2014, 10:57 PM
How about if you wash them by hand, squeeze them dry with a few paper towels, then allow them to dry flat for 2 or 3 days. When they are fully dry, just place them into freezer bags. I've done it quite a few times and never had a problem.
LS6

Mold comes from dampness so if they are real dry you should be ok. That's usually not a problem with wool but foam can be difficult to get dry to the core and can generate mold when sealed.

LS6
01-10-2014, 01:24 AM
Mold comes from dampness so if they are real dry you should be ok. That's usually not a problem with wool but foam can be difficult to get dry to the core and can generate mold when sealed.

If you wrap a sufficient number of Viva or Bounty paper towels around the foam pad and squeeze very well, the heavy moisture will be sucked out. Three days of air drying will complete the job. I've never had a problem. However, I normally use the 5 and 1/2 inch foam pads, which are easier to squeeze dry, as opposed to a 7 inch pad.
LS6

Dennis N. Schmidt
03-16-2014, 10:27 PM
Wash them out in the sink and then spin them dry on the buffer at high speed for three minutes. This dries them fairly thoroughly so that they can then be placed in a Ziplock.