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gresalfi
12-25-2013, 07:07 PM
I'm questioning my block choices for color sanding and am wondering what others do. I have been starting with 800 on a 11" Durablock and continuing with the full sheet block's through 2000 before switching to the shorter softer blocks. It's been working for me well enough to get best paint in a fairly large Hot Rod and Classic show with a black single stage 1965 Comet. The problem is I always see need for improvement and question my methods.

Am I using to long of a block and cutting away more paint then needed?

Should I start with a more accurately straight block? I do check the DuraBlocks from time to time by placing them against a window to see if they have distorted and make sure I flip them now and then to make sure the cut isn't heavy on one side or the other but never have the confidence in them that I have with a well tuned wood plane.

Or am I insane and need to lighten up?

Bob K
12-25-2013, 07:22 PM
You are the one you have to please. If that is what you have to do to get the results you want then there probably isnít any short cut. For myself I put a Trizact clear coat sanding disc (1500 grit) on my AirVantage sander and go at the paint with a little water and sometimes an interface pad. I like my results but I am not trying to please someone else. The time I spend doing that is very short and the physical effort is akin to watching paint dry, but I donít make show cars. Just cars I like. You would have a hard time convincing me that I would be happier expending 1000% more effort for 10% better finish.

Bob K

Len
12-27-2013, 08:03 AM
I'm questioning my block choices for color sanding and am wondering what others do. I have been starting with 800 on a 11" Durablock and continuing with the full sheet block's through 2000 before switching to the shorter softer blocks. It's been working for me well enough to get best paint in a fairly large Hot Rod and Classic show with a black single stage 1965 Comet. The problem is I always see need for improvement and question my methods.

Am I using to long of a block and cutting away more paint then needed?

Should I start with a more accurately straight block? I do check the DuraBlocks from time to time by placing them against a window to see if they have distorted and make sure I flip them now and then to make sure the cut isn't heavy on one side or the other but never have the confidence in them that I have with a well tuned wood plane.

Or am I insane and need to lighten up?

If we are sanding by hand we normally use a stiff but flexible hand block like the one shown below. Hand sanding is a labor intensive process so we (like Bob) normally use our AirVantage sander to do 90% of the work quickly and easily. By hand or by machine we normally start with 1500 grit then jump to 2500 or 3000 to finish the wet sanding before we start polishing.



http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/drbaf4405.jpg (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=ABS&Product_Code=DRBAF4405&Category_Code=TFSL)

gtome
12-27-2013, 05:26 PM
I'm questioning my block choices for color sanding and am wondering what others do. I have been starting with 800 on a 11" Durablock and continuing with the full sheet block's through 2000 before switching to the shorter softer blocks. It's been working for me well enough to get best paint in a fairly large Hot Rod and Classic show with a black single stage 1965 Comet. The problem is I always see need for improvement and question my methods.

Am I using to long of a block and cutting away more paint then needed?

Should I start with a more accurately straight block? I do check the DuraBlocks from time to time by placing them against a window to see if they have distorted and make sure I flip them now and then to make sure the cut isn't heavy on one side or the other but never have the confidence in them that I have with a well tuned wood plane.

Or am I insane and need to lighten up?

This almost exactly how I do our show cars and full restos.

I did make some blocks out of soft balsa wood. But 99% of the time I do it just as you described, and it turns out amazing.

Also Ive started with 600 before, but I prefer 800. Using a 600-800 paper is only way I have ever been able to fully get rid of that urethane wave you see in paint.

gresalfi
12-27-2013, 08:06 PM
Thanks, Just questioning my methods. I work alone and learned most of my bodywork here. Just finished this 55 T-bird hardtop that was run over. Came out almost perfect.

13008

Sprayed it with my new Sagola, much better then my DeVilbiss Plus. The only problem I have with the Sagola is the Human at the trigger end!

I have to repaint the rest since I cut through during the sand and buff

Len
12-27-2013, 10:02 PM
Beautiful paint job on the top.