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TheCoatingStore.com

sideline
09-26-2013, 08:27 PM
buffing to a shine has never had a comfortable place with me but i managed on enamel one stage paints OK. Now I've dived into base coat / clear coat and like it.(totally a hobby) I've searched on these forums and learned a bunch, thank you for that
here's my question, Basically, I have a newly applied limco urethane clear coat that needs some flattening and dust removal. . fyi- There's 4 even coats of clear applied.

I have sanding blocks for wet sanding and a dewalt849 with wool and various foam polishing pads. What i need is a step by step, to the point lesson on the rite way to go about getting the orange peel and dust spots out of the clear.
-Nothing fancy, i want to get it looking flat and shiny. This is a learning job for me and would like the proper way to do this with the tools i have, step by step with proper applicator and technique used would be great as ive never had a lesson. I'll purchase whatever compounds or polishes i need. Currently only have 3m fines-it 2 i believe.
Big Thank you in advance.

Len
09-26-2013, 10:26 PM
In most cases of dust nibs and/or paint runs we use a coarse nib file to remove most of the high spot then block sand until that area is almost level then sand the entire surface with some 1500 Trizact then 3000 Trizact then polish.


http://www.autobodystore.com/runfile.jpg
Run and Nib Repair Link (http://www.autobodystore.com/run_repair.shtml)

Once you've leveled the nibs and runs then the surface can be sanded to remove orange peel. Removing peel can be done by hand with ultra fine wet sandpaper or by using a DA with dry or wet sandpaper. Below is a link to sanding out peel using the hand method but you can save a lot of time and labor by sanding with Trizact on a DA.


http://www.autobodystore.com/comp3.jpg
Leveling Peel Link (http://www.autobodystore.com/rsw.shtml)










http://www.autobodystore.com/rsw.shtml

sideline
09-27-2013, 12:28 PM
Thank you Len, You pointed me in the needed direction. Do you possibly have a link or suggestion when it comes to the dewalt buffer, speed, product used & technique for the next steps as far as polishing the clear-coat after the sanding? (i no i'm asking a lot)

I've had friends that buff and polish and have learned some from them.
I've found a bunch of tutorials on the net but am asking here do to the forum members skill set and there knowledge.
The trizact interests me but I'd like to use the tools i have and get proficient with them before getting more involved.
thanks again

Len
09-27-2013, 01:04 PM
Thank you Len, You pointed me in the needed direction. Do you possibly have a link or suggestion when it comes to the dewalt buffer, speed, product used & technique for the next steps as far as polishing the clear-coat after the sanding? (i no i'm asking a lot)

I've had friends that buff and polish and have learned some from them.
I've found a bunch of tutorials on the net but am asking here do to the forum members skill set and there knowledge.
The trizact interests me but I'd like to use the tools i have and get proficient with them before getting more involved.
thanks again

Depending on what type of scratch you leave to be polished out you can start buffing using a slow rotation (under 1000 RPM) with some pressure on the pad and as you reach a glossy result you can increase the speed and apply less pressure on the pad.

Make sure that you put more pressure on one side of the pad so that the machine is easier to control. In most cases the part of the pad doing the work is between the top and the R/H side but that can vary based on where you're buffing.

The rotation of the pad should be OFF of the edge or peak of the panels you're buffing, if the rotation is ONTO the panel the pad will have a tendency to remove the paint from the edge or peak.

Start slow until you get the feel for what you're doing.