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69-er
08-19-2013, 08:40 PM
I was watching a Meguiar's video from 2009 showing their methods and products on wet sanding, machine polishing etc. They recommend laying the rotary buffer pad flat on the surface. I've seen several references elsewhere where the pad is slightly tilted.

Are there any pros or cons to either method?

Len
08-19-2013, 09:19 PM
I was watching a Meguiar's video from 2009 showing their methods and products on wet sanding, machine polishing etc. They recommend laying the rotary buffer pad flat on the surface. I've seen several references elsewhere where the pad is slightly tilted.

Are there any pros or cons to either method?

I don't know how you could buff with rotary buffer holding the pad flat against the surface, the machine jumps all over the place. You've got to angle the buffer slightly so that the rotation is pulling or pushing in one direction or the other. Try it and you'll see what I mean.

Using an orbital polisher you can lay the pad flat on the surface.

style
08-19-2013, 11:44 PM
I was watching a Meguiar's video from 2009 showing their methods and products on wet sanding, machine polishing etc. They recommend laying the rotary buffer pad flat on the surface. I've seen several references elsewhere where the pad is slightly tilted.

Are there any pros or cons to either method?

ive used it both ways, I use it flat and at full speed to cut large flat areas and adjust speed as I go when I come to an edge etc ..

if it is jumping len you have heated up your material to much try misting your pad with water or try making sure your pad is centered for this I use a socket then set the pad on over it,or buy a self centering pad like Norton dry ice pad 1 or pad 3 pad 2 is crap..

Len
08-20-2013, 06:44 AM
ive used it both ways, I use it flat and at full speed to cut large flat areas and adjust speed as I go when I come to an edge etc ..

if it is jumping len you have heated up your material to much try misting your pad with water or try making sure your pad is centered for this I use a socket then set the pad on over it,or buy a self centering pad like Norton dry ice pad 1 or pad 3 pad 2 is crap..

Centering the pad or the type of pad or compound has nothing to do with the pad jumping around. If you apply almost no pressure to the pad then you may be able to use it flat but if you are trying to cut sanding scratches you need pressure and you'll need to use one side of the pad.

Robert
08-20-2013, 08:35 AM
Even when they say lay the pad flat, the pad is weighted a bit more on the right side.

My technique is different though. I think more about making even pressure across my contact patch and being sure to run off of or parallel to the edges.

There are in my experience very few truly flat surfaces on a car - there's always some curve. When there's a curve, say the top of a fender or back rounded part of the trunk, there are really two curves. I look for the straightest line. If you look at a bucket, the sides are flat in one direction and curved the other. I try to buff along the flattest lines.

I also try to make the buff pad contact as much of that line as possible so the pressure is evenly distributed.

I think it's time for a video.

Robert

Henry
08-20-2013, 10:17 AM
I was watching a Meguiar's video from 2009 showing their methods and products on wet sanding, machine polishing etc. They recommend laying the rotary buffer pad flat on the surface. I've seen several references elsewhere where the pad is slightly tilted.

Are there any pros or cons to either method?

In driving somewhere, you have MDR or 'most direct route or PLR 'path of least resistance. Apply this thought to buffing.

I always buff after sanding or just compounding at surface with my pad at 25% or 1/4 in use on the surface. I normally go 12 to 3 o'clock position. Often 9 - 12 or 6 - 9. By doing this I am able to concentrate the pad to to task at hand in a quicker manner and have absolute control over the buffer. I can steer my pad exactly where I need it to do the work and be able to see the result I'm getting. There is more pressure doing it as I've said especially on newly sanded paint. I think you'll find the majority of people doing this work do it the way I said for compounding with a wool or the famous "orange" pad of the Sure Finish kit.

I do this the same with a foam pad for swirl remover or glazing. I tried toward the end of compounding and glazing a couple times to lay the pad flat and I did not like how the pad acted. Seemed to want to steer out of contol that I wanted and doesn't take long before it started to hop along the surface. I want TOTAL CONTROL of what my buffer is doing and I can only get that by how I described above.

I don't know what you saw so I won't comment on it but it does not seem it could be effective for the results I'm after.

Below is the expert (ROBERT) showing you what I'm talking about: Several videos here. Go down to HIGH SPEED POLISHING & BUFFING which is the 4t video down. Please let us know how this helps you. Seeing is believing and Robert has spent hs life as a Professional doing this to multi-million dollar automobiles. Good luck.

http://autobodystore.com/forum/showthread.php?23828-Robert-s-Detailing-Videos

Henry

Len
08-20-2013, 10:35 AM
Thanks Henry, good idea linking one of Robert's videos. You can see him using both the rotary angled slightly and the duel action machine being used flat on the surface. I talked to Robert today and he said that it may appear that the buffer is being used flat but the work is actually being done using one side or the other of the rotary machine.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=9LngsIHuGfc

TOGWT
09-10-2013, 06:13 AM
Many of the readers on Meguire's forum are new to detailing and most that use machine polisher's use a random orbital. The methodologies for Rotary seem to be confused with random orbital machines (but most don't use rotaries so no harm, as those that do have been doing it a while anyway)

Robert's advice on machine polishing / finishing is usually correct; so a much better choice between the two for advice