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junk
01-21-2013, 08:05 AM
I picked up some trizact at my local Autobody store. 1500 and 3000. I thought I had a 3/32" throw dynabrade, but it appears I have a 3/16" throw sander going off the part number. Is there an easy way to measure the throw? Will that be OK for sanding with the trizact?

Second question the 1500 trizact was similar to normal sand paper versus the 3000 trizact was on a very thin foam back. Is that correct? I'm a little afraid I bought the wrong stuff. Both of them are Hookit backing.

Also how thick is an interface pad? And I'm assuming I use the interface pad with both the 1500 and 3000 trizact.

I've tried to do a bunch of reading on how to sand clear using trizact, but haven't been able to put it all together yet. A lot of the info I found and Roberts video had people buffing after 1200 or 1500 grit, but a lot of the post are all buffing after 3000 now.

Thanks,
Jeremy

Len
01-21-2013, 09:07 AM
Both the 3/16 and 3/32 will work, you just need to use a lighter touch with the 3/16 and 1500 because it's more aggressive than the 3/32 sander. When sanding with the 3000 the 3/16 works fine. The interface pad is about 1/2" thick and is usually used with the 1500 grit so that it conforms to the gentle curves as you sand and you don't sand through as easily. We don't use an interface pad with the 3000 grit because it has a cushioned back and isn't as aggressive. It sounds like you have the correct tools and materials just take your time and keep dampening the surface while you sand, I like using a Windex-type sprayer willed with water for that job.

While you're sanding use a squeegee to wipe the water from the surface so that you can see your progress and won't tend to sand too much off.

junk
01-21-2013, 09:20 AM
Len - Thanks again. That's what I needed to know. I'm going to start playing with Traizact now.

Do you start with anything courser than 1500 for general color sanding?

I did the glazing putty run sanding trick last week also and thought it was very cool. I went slow and was worried the whole time, but in the end it turned out really nice. I love this place for all the tips and tricks.

Len
01-21-2013, 10:34 AM
Len - Thanks again. That's what I needed to know. I'm going to start playing with Traizact now.

Do you start with anything courser than 1500 for general color sanding?

I did the glazing putty run sanding trick last week also and thought it was very cool. I went slow and was worried the whole time, but in the end it turned out really nice. I love this place for all the tips and tricks.

In most cases you should be able to start with 1500 but if the surface is real rough you may need a more coarse grit before going to the 1500.

gtome
01-21-2013, 10:40 PM
Len (or anyone) I also usually start with 1500, but it does seem like if I sand with 1000 wet by hand first its a little flatter looking when finished. Suppose its all in my head or could there be something to that?

Len
01-22-2013, 04:21 AM
Len (or anyone) I also usually start with 1500, but it does seem like if I sand with 1000 wet by hand first its a little flatter looking when finished. Suppose its all in my head or could there be something to that?

Yes, a more coarse grit on a hard block can make the surface flatter but you need to make sure you have enough paint on the surface so that you don't sand through. We do quite a few show cars and rarely sand with anything more coarse than 1500.

gtome
01-22-2013, 06:41 AM
I usually only go at it with 1000 if im getting a bit more orange peel than id like. Just to cut it a little faster.

TOGWT
01-29-2013, 04:48 AM
These pads may be of some interest, but bear in mind I'm a detailer not a painter; so the articles I write are aimed at this type of readership...

CarPro Orange Peel Removal Pads - you can now remove or substantially reduce orange peel in the top layer without sanding. While removing orange peel and deep defects you are also polishing the paint rather than leaving sanding marks, which reduces the steps needed afterwards.
These pads have a very aggressive abrasive and are deceptive; they have twice the rate of cut of typical wool pads. They don't dull the paint like sanding so it may appear you aren't removing paint but you most certainly are.

They are intended for use by professionals who are very familiar with film thickness, compounding, polishing, and the dos and don’ts of paint correction. Theses pads are designed for use with a rotary polisher, average removal is approximately 5µ (0 .2Mil) - 7.5µ (0. 3 Mil)

These pads are available in two configurations: Denim (2000 Grit) is the more aggressive and designed for the removal of severe texture from refinished paints and Velvet (3000 Grit) is used for removing light orange peel from thin, factory-applied paint; both pads utilizing CarPro Fixer as a lubrication / compound.

Use very little pressure and check the paint surface temperature often. Similar to ‘block sanding’ the pad / backing plate are rigid enough that when used correctly it abrades the paint ridges (high spots) faster than the valleys. Either pad will polish the paint as it removes orange peel requiring only one or two additional polishing steps to create level paint that reflects accurately. These pads should only be used with proper knowledge of clear coat thickness in conjunction with a paint thickness gauge. As with any aggressive abrasion method be very cautious with factory OEM paint.

There are two considerations; (a) how much clear coat (b) how much ultra violet protection can be removed, they are not interchangeable. The following are the maximum allowable clear coat reductions the major USA car manufacturers will allow before the paint warranty becomes void; Chrysler- 0.5 Mil (12µ) Ford – 0.3 Mil (7.5 µ) and GM – 0.5 Mil (12µ) (Source - Automotive International)

You should initially try these on a test panel and get an idea of just how fast they remove paint. Using little or no pressure (machine weight alone) start a low 600-700 RPM and then progress to 1200 RPM, at this speed the kinetic heat produced by these pads is high so it is wise to constantly check paint surface temperature. The pad / backing plate combination is rigid an so acts in a similar way to 'block sanding’, removing the high spots before the valleys, maintain the pad flat and parallel to the surface; a spritz of distilled water can be used to reduce the surface temperature, but beware of product spatter