PDA

View Full Version : What would be the best way to buff a small part?


TheCoatingStore.com

ric's62
11-05-2011, 11:59 PM
I have a small dash mounted clock that i painted with a s.s. poly, standing up on it's end. Ended up with a fat edge where the paint sagged. After sanding with 1500, what would be the best way to buff this out. It's about 2" dia. and 3" long. Only machines i have are a 4" Bosch and 6" Metabo elec. random orbit woodworking sanders. Thanks, Rick

Len
11-06-2011, 06:34 AM
I have a small dash mounted clock that i painted with a s.s. poly, standing up on it's end. Ended up with a fat edge where the paint sagged. After sanding with 1500, what would be the best way to buff this out. It's about 2" dia. and 3" long. Only machines i have are a 4" Bosch and 6" Metabo elec. random orbit woodworking sanders. Thanks, Rick

Random orbitals are ok for removing swirls after buffing but not for removing sanding scratches. In order to remove scratches you need a rotary because a RO takes much too long to accomplish anything. We would use our 3" polisher with a foam pad after clamping the piece to the work bench or placing it in a vice to hold it while we buff. We would use Sure Finish Polish but any good quality polish could do the job.


http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/CP-7201P.jpe
3" Polisher Link (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=ABS&Product_Code=CP7201P&Category_Code=T2)

http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/3inpads.jpg
3" Polishing Pad Link (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=ABS&Product_Code=3inpad&Category_Code=T2)

Henry
11-06-2011, 10:42 AM
I have a small dash mounted clock that i painted with a s.s. poly, standing up on it's end. Ended up with a fat edge where the paint sagged. After sanding with 1500, what would be the best way to buff this out. It's about 2" dia. and 3" long. Only machines i have are a 4" Bosch and 6" Metabo elec. random orbit woodworking sanders. Thanks, Rick

I would prefer Len's way because that's a nice tool to have.

However, if you're brave with great control, you could mount a buffing pad in a 6 inch bench grinder and GINGERLY but the clock. Let us know what you do. Henry

tomsteve
11-06-2011, 11:02 AM
i use my drill press and various set ups i made for buffing/polishing various items.

MARTINSR
11-06-2011, 11:50 AM
Moving it up to 3000 grit would help you a lot too. Even by hand then just a touch of the buffer and it's shiny. Of course the best way to handle it is to simply put another coat of paint on it being more careful not to have any flaws. A slight texture is usually acceptable and a small item like that will often have next to no texture at all.

Brian

Mooch
11-06-2011, 02:41 PM
I have a small dash mounted clock that i painted with a s.s. poly, standing up on it's end. Ended up with a fat edge where the paint sagged. After sanding with 1500, what would be the best way to buff this out. It's about 2" dia. and 3" long. Only machines i have are a 4" Bosch and 6" Metabo elec. random orbit woodworking sanders. Thanks, Rick

Could you post a picture Rick ?

Mooch

Len
11-06-2011, 04:56 PM
i use my drill press and various set ups i made for buffing/polishing various items.

You reminded me of a tool that we sell that is a lot less expensive than the pneumatic polisher that I posted above. We sell a lot of these 3" hook and loop backing plate/stems that you can use with your hand drill and the 3" pads posted above.


http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/3bp.jpg
LINK (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=ABS&Product_Code=ST300&Category_Code=T2)

tomsteve
11-07-2011, 07:32 AM
You reminded me of a tool that we sell that is a lot less expensive than the pneumatic polisher that I posted above. We sell a lot of these 3" hook and loop backing plate/stems that you can use with your hand drill and the 3" pads posted above.


http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/3bp.jpg
LINK (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=ABS&Product_Code=ST300&Category_Code=T2)

yup. thats one of em. got it in a headlight restoration kit that was given to me and i never used it for headlights, but it comes in handy on the drill press.

ric's62
11-09-2011, 12:51 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I had forgot to include..." or should i just repaint". That probably would be the quickest, but i don't have a lot of that paint left and still need to paint the dash. I like the small pad len showed. i know i could use that on other small areas like the dash etc. and when it comes time to spend the money on a sander/ polisher, it probably should be a big one for the body of the car. If i did buff it, would sure finish be the only material i would need?
Thanks again, Rick

Len
11-09-2011, 08:59 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I had forgot to include..." or should i just repaint". That probably would be the quickest, but i don't have a lot of that paint left and still need to paint the dash. I like the small pad len showed. i know i could use that on other small areas like the dash etc. and when it comes time to spend the money on a sander/ polisher, it probably should be a big one for the body of the car. If i did buff it, would sure finish be the only material i would need?
Thanks again, Rick

Yes, a large 6" sander for most work and yes Sure Finish is the only polish you need.

gtome
01-18-2012, 08:25 PM
I have one of those mini polishers and its awesome on the old cars I do, like where the roof meets the quarter and the ledges under the rear passengers side windows. Good for dashes and the tops of the inside of doors etc.... but I think I would just sand that part you have and repaint it. Lay it on its back when you paint if you can. Will let the paint/clear flatten out better.