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Kustomdog
06-21-2011, 04:47 PM
I just finished a 7 yr restore on a 62 galaxie.I used ppg concept in Wimbledon. White. I put on 3 wet coats and got open more. On the sides than on the hood roof n trunk.I wet sanded with 3m 1000 grit but didn't. Remove all the open I was afraid I'd cut thru.I plan to W's with 1500 next than 2000 than buff with presta UV creamed with a wool pad.my mentor has a Hutchinson waterbug sander but he never liked machine. Sanding fresh paint.this is a lot of work by hand.is it ok that I didn't remove all the open with the 1000grit as long as its removed. With the finer grits.thanks

Robert
06-22-2011, 12:08 AM
after that, you're just refining the scratch. So, don't stop till the first cut is done. The orange peel won't be significantly cut by the following steps.

If you think it will, then try it. It won't but it might not matter. It might be good enough.



Robert

JCCLARK
06-22-2011, 06:27 AM
It just depends on the finish you want.
I don't sand my "collision repair" cars all the way,
I want it to match the factory finish, which usually has a
little peel to it. On higher end cars with a smoother finish,
I sand the peel completly away.
For a "show car" finish I'll start sdanding at 400 grit
and work my way up.
Any process will still produce a great gloss, it's how flat and
straight you want it that the grits and procedure will affect.:)

Henry
06-22-2011, 07:49 AM
It just depends on the finish you want.
I don't sand my "collision repair" cars all the way,
I want it to match the factory finish, which usually has a
little peel to it. On higher end cars with a smoother finish,
I sand the peel completly away.
For a "show car" finish I'll start sdanding at 400 grit
and work my way up.
Any process will still produce a great gloss, it's how flat and
straight you want it that the grits and procedure will affect.:)

How come you start with 400? To me, that's removing a lot of material and putting a heavy scratch in the new paint. Thanks. Henry

JCCLARK
06-22-2011, 12:22 PM
I have found I have to go down to 600 min, and 400 is even better to
remove ALL the urethane wave.
We're talking dead straight show car finish.
You have to look down the panel sideways in good light to see the
difference, but it's there. the reflections are crisp straight lines.

Robert
06-22-2011, 10:45 PM
and move your head toward and away from the car and up and down to see it all. And then, you have to be ready for people watching to look funny at you and make jokes...

Robert

style
06-23-2011, 02:10 AM
i have found i have to go down to 600 min, and 400 is even better to
remove all the urethane wave.
We're talking dead straight show car finish.
You have to look down the panel sideways in good light to see the
difference, but it's there. The reflections are crisp straight lines.

just curious how many coats of clear your putting to be comfortable removing that much and still haveing the paint last awhile...

Damn caps is jambed up:[...

JCCLARK
06-23-2011, 10:27 AM
You don't really remove that much more with the 400,
I just sand till the orange peel is gone, so the only additional
removal is the 400 scratches.
4 good coats will work.
I like to put on 5 to be safe.
I also like to flow coat it after a good 400 sanding
and then use a finer grit.
Not to often I get to do 400 on clear, 99% of my work is
small collision repair and I don't want a finish that slick.8)

Len
06-23-2011, 12:37 PM
You don't really remove that much more with the 400,
I just sand till the orange peel is gone, so the only additional
removal is the 400 scratches.
4 good coats will work.
I like to put on 5 to be safe.
I also like to flow coat it after a good 400 sanding
and then use a finer grit.
Not to often I get to do 400 on clear, 99% of my work is
small collision repair and I don't want a finish that slick.8)

So you spray with 4 coats of clear, sand with 400 wet then mask the vehicle again and apply more clear? What then? I guess this is a $10K+ paint job.

JCCLARK
06-23-2011, 02:20 PM
Well it should be a 10K paint job!!!
But I'm a "hobby" painter and don't get near what it's worth.
I got 6K for a Vette that way.

I always dry sand clear with the coarser grits,
wear cotton gloves and wipe as you go,
you can reallyl see what you're doing that way.
It goes really fast.

TR3_Nut
07-05-2011, 04:14 PM
You don't really remove that much more with the 400,
I just sand till the orange peel is gone, so the only additional
removal is the 400 scratches.
4 good coats will work.
I like to put on 5 to be safe.
I also like to flow coat it after a good 400 sanding
and then use a finer grit.
Not to often I get to do 400 on clear, 99% of my work is
small collision repair and I don't want a finish that slick.8)

What does it mean to "flow coat it after a good 400 sanding? What is "flow coat"? An additional coat of clear, after the first few coats of clear and sanding? Then, don't you need to sand again to remove any minor orange peel?

Len
07-05-2011, 05:13 PM
What does it mean to "flow coat it after a good 400 sanding? What is "flow coat"? An additional coat of clear, after the first few coats of clear and sanding? Then, don't you need to sand again to remove any minor orange peel?

Flow coating doesn't make sense unless you're in a "GOOD" down draft spray booth using the best type of tools, materials and technique because, using anything less, you'll need to sand it again anyway before polishing. For the average painter the best way to get optimum results is to apply three or four coats of clear then sand it level and polish it to perfection.