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jack_davey
02-24-2011, 05:56 PM
I'm painting a set of wheels for a friend. I've had them sandblasted to remove all traces of the old paint, I then used high build primer followed by regular 2k, then an anthracite/charcoal grey metallic base coat followed by 2k clearcoat.

I got some runs on one of the wheels, I started to flat them out with 1500 dry, but it just wasnt removing the runs, so I switched to 1200 dry which had pretty much the same effect, I jumped to 600, which worked getting most of the lumps out. Then I switched back to 1200 to finish it off and it has cut through the clearcoat and gone back to the grey primer right on the edge that meets the inside of the wheel.

Obviously I've f***ed up big time, but how can I avoid it next time? Obviously if there's no runs to flat out I wouldn't have this problem, but how do I get flat a run without burning through to primer either side of the run?

Also will I be able to spray some base coat just in that area and then clearcoat the whole wheel or will I have to spray the entire wheel with basecoat in order for it to match?

Forgive my ignorance but I'm a hobbyist and not a professional.

Thanks

Len
02-24-2011, 08:37 PM
I'm painting a set of wheels for a friend. I've had them sandblasted to remove all traces of the old paint, I then used high build primer followed by regular 2k, then an anthracite/charcoal grey metallic base coat followed by 2k clearcoat.

I got some runs on one of the wheels, I started to flat them out with 1500 dry, but it just wasnt removing the runs, so I switched to 1200 dry which had pretty much the same effect, I jumped to 600, which worked getting most of the lumps out. Then I switched back to 1200 to finish it off and it has cut through the clearcoat and gone back to the grey primer right on the edge that meets the inside of the wheel.

Obviously I've f***ed up big time, but how can I avoid it next time? Obviously if there's no runs to flat out I wouldn't have this problem, but how do I get flat a run without burning through to primer either side of the run?

Also will I be able to spray some base coat just in that area and then clearcoat the whole wheel or will I have to spray the entire wheel with basecoat in order for it to match?

Forgive my ignorance but I'm a hobbyist and not a professional.

Thanks

Removing runs on a car's exterior panel without going through the clear is difficult but removing one on a wheel is much more difficult. I would follow the same procedure (linked below) on the wheel as I would on anything else EXCEPT I would surrender to the fact that I'm going to go through and need to repaint.

You can spot paint over the problem but you'll need to clear the entire wheel but there could be problems. When you apply you base over the problem it can sometimes react with the existing paint and wrinkle around the sanded area. It's usually best to apply a little clear, allow it to harden then sand the entire wheel, spot your base the clear the wheel.

Next time apply your first coat of clear then allow it to DRY TO THE TOUCH before applying your next coats. This "tack coat" will help stop the paint from sliding into run formation.


http://www.autobodystore.com/runfile.jpg
Run Repair LINK (http://www.autobodystore.com/run_repair.shtml)

tech69
02-24-2011, 09:23 PM
If you used 600 and never removed a run before you might as well start prepping that thing for another round of paint. The key to fix runs is to only touch the run til it's almost sanded out, and even when it's sanded out you still have to view it with a sheen and at angles cause you could be left with tiny waves or shadows of the run.

Arnolt
02-25-2011, 08:38 AM
I read a post a while back from Len about using putty to remove a run. This seems like a fairly safe way to remove a run without sanding through although it may not be applicable for a wheel repair. I'm planning on trying this method over the weekend.

Len
02-25-2011, 11:03 AM
I read a post a while back from Len about using putty to remove a run. This seems like a fairly safe way to remove a run without sanding through although it may not be applicable for a wheel repair. I'm planning on trying this method over the weekend.

Yes, we used polyester putty on the paint after hitting the run with a Nib File and it worked great. I forgot about that trick.



Click to Enlarge
5664

Arnolt
02-25-2011, 11:29 AM
Len, I was planning on using Rage Extreme. I have it on hand. Would that work in place of Quantum 1?

Len
02-25-2011, 11:51 AM
Len, I was planning on using Rage Extreme. I have it on hand. Would that work in place of Quantum 1?

Yes, that should be fine.

M DAGG
03-03-2011, 06:51 PM
I read where you used putty coat on runs last year.I tried that at home and it works great and it was on single stage.I started going to college for autobody you should of seen their faces when i put putty coat on a run and sanded it out.The teacher and his helper was surprised.This is a good site for learning.

Arnolt
03-04-2011, 09:08 AM
I tried this yesterday on clear and couldn't be happier with the results.

jack_davey
03-09-2011, 04:49 PM
All sorted.

I sanded down the runs with 400 and then 600. Scotched the entire wheel.
Hit the areas where I had burned through with base and then clear coated the entire wheel.

You would never know any of it was there! :D

Incidently, I had the mother of all f*** ups today when I clear coated another one of the wheels. I tilted the gun to spray inside the spokes and a few drops flew out of the top of the cup and landed on the wheel! Anyone had this happen before?

By the way, the idea of using putty when flatting a run looks genius!

Bob K
03-09-2011, 06:57 PM
Be sure to clean the vent hole in the paint cup cap or next time you use the gun you will be getting sputtering because the cap vent is plugged. Some guns have two holes that need to be cleaned. If ether one of those gets plugged then the gun starts sputtering after a short time spraying. Just a friendly reminder, please disregard if you already attended to that little chore.

Bob K

Len
03-09-2011, 08:44 PM
All sorted.

I sanded down the runs with 400 and then 600. Scotched the entire wheel.
Hit the areas where I had burned through with base and then clear coated the entire wheel.

You would never know any of it was there! :D

Incidently, I had the mother of all f*** ups today when I clear coated another one of the wheels. I tilted the gun to spray inside the spokes and a few drops flew out of the top of the cup and landed on the wheel! Anyone had this happen before?

By the way, the idea of using putty when flatting a run looks genius!

I am now addicted to the DeVilbiss DeKups and whenever I spray I don't need to worry about spilling paint because you can spray holding the gun at any angle. There is no vent hole and it makes cleaning the gun easier.


http://www.autobodystore.com/dekupongun.jpg
DeVilbiss Link then scroll down to the DeKup parts (http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=1D)

jack_davey
03-13-2011, 05:19 PM
Though I'd share a few pictures of the finished product...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e384/davey_jack/IMG_0267.jpg
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e384/davey_jack/IMG_0258.jpg

They still need a polish, but as I cant bake them and it's pretty cold here at the moment I'll leave them to cure for a few weeks I think.


And the tools I'm working with...basic I know but they do the job for a DIY person like me.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e384/davey_jack/IMG_0262.jpg
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e384/davey_jack/IMG_0263.jpg

Comments/Criticism welcome

Len
03-13-2011, 05:44 PM
Looks good Jack but don't try to paint a car using that combination of compressor and gun or you will most likely run into problems. When spraying rims you can use almost any equipment because your spraying in short blasts and not using much air.

Did you paint the back of the rims or just the fronts. They look great but try to keep them above 50 degrees F for a while so that they cure properly.

Also, in most cases, it pays to mount the tires first then break (or don't pop the bead) on the outside then back-tape the face and paint. Doing this you don't take the chance of damaging the paint by mounting the tire.

jack_davey
03-14-2011, 08:22 AM
Yeah I'd never try and paint a whole car with that compressor, but I've done wings (or fenders as you folk call them :D) and they've turned out alright.

Yeah I painted the inside and the backs of the rims but they dont look fantastic due to not having a smooth surface, it looks as if they have lathe (or some sort of machining process) lines on the inside, but I managed to get a nice wet coat of lacquer over them to smooth them out a bit.

I would normally just break the bead of the tyre and mask it, but my friend needed the tyres and the wheels neaded to be bead blasted anyway.