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thekrkndls
10-14-2010, 10:47 PM
Just finished buffing/polishing a few panels (Sure Finish) and noticed that when I look at the panels in the right light, there appears to be some "texture" to the panel. I'm using an air vantage w/1500 finishing film followed by 2000grit trizact. I'm pretty sure I'm removing the orange peel by virtue that the "shiny" spots are gone.
However, since these panels were a little heavy on the orange peel, I'm wondering if I didn't really level the peel with the 1500. In this case would I be better off with an initial cut of 800 or 1000 using a block? Maybe then, Id end up with a nice flat surface?

Any thoughts?

tech69
10-14-2010, 10:56 PM
There's nothing really to help in that aspect as peel is different for different planes at times. The fix is checking your progress.


buffing was only frustrating for me when adding grits below 1000. As soon as I went from 1500 to 2000+ everything was a cakewalk.

You're fine with 1500 unless you have real nasty peel. I'd say the problem is contaminants(oil/water) that are too low for you to sand out or you didn't check your peel enough with a squeegy and have uneven results. With a squeegy there's no need to take it to a buffer to know, wiping the cloudy water off with a squeegy will you tell you when to go to the next step. With your grit setup I would have just cut it flat til there was no peel then, which would have meant checking plenty of times sanding here and there.

Len
10-14-2010, 11:27 PM
Just finished buffing/polishing a few panels (Sure Finish) and noticed that when I look at the panels in the right light, there appears to be some "texture" to the panel. I'm using an air vantage w/1500 finishing film followed by 2000grit trizact. I'm pretty sure I'm removing the orange peel by virtue that the "shiny" spots are gone.
However, since these panels were a little heavy on the orange peel, I'm wondering if I didn't really level the peel with the 1500. In this case would I be better off with an initial cut of 800 or 1000 using a block? Maybe then, Id end up with a nice flat surface?

Any thoughts?

For a perfectly flat panel you may need to use a hard block and some 800 grit wet sandpaper to level the peel then remove the 800 scratch with the AirVantage with 1500 Finishing Film or Trizact then 3000 Trizact.

Bob K
10-16-2010, 01:08 AM
I got some from Len, Trizact Clear Coat Sanding Discs. Best thing since sliced bread.

http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=3M2088&Category_Code=M3

Bob K

thekrkndls
10-18-2010, 10:13 PM
I switched to a more aggressive wool pad for the initial cut and spent a little more time on the panels. I noticed that finished panel looks much better and the "texture" appears to be gone. I wonder if I just wasn't getting the clear cut well enough.

Robert
10-18-2010, 11:17 PM
Flatness is determined by the grit of the sandpaper and the hardness of the block you start with. A very hard block with 1000 will flatten about the same as medium hard block with 800, depending on the paint.

Modern paints are so hard that anything higher than 800 has almost no hope of getting a perfectly flat surface, but seriously, unless you have perfect body work you need a little orange peel to keep the waves from showing.

Because there's only so much clear, if the paint isn't flat enough after you polish, going back and cutting again with an aggressive paper is dangerous in the short run and is pretty certain to shorten the lifespan of the paint by thinning the clear so much UV isn't blocked.

But back to original point. No matter how aggressive the compound or hard the buff pad it will mimic the orange peel. It'll cut the scratch but the orange peel is a different thing all together. The pad just rolls over it.