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psyclone07
06-09-2010, 05:23 PM
Alright my car is officially painted and there was a few dust nibs here and there. I plan to remove them and in process start wetsanding and buffing the entire car. I have a few questions though.

I have a snap on palm sander which looks lsomething like this
http://www.denlorstools.com/shop/images/AP-3022.jpg

would this be ok to start my sanding with? I was thinking of doing it by hand because i fear im going to mess up something. Do i need the interface sponge pad?

I was looking at buying this

http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=3M2-07specB&Category_Code=M3

this should be enough to do one car correct? Is the finish film used with water as well or is water only a part of the trizact sanding? I just want to make sure i know what im doing before i start this job. Im probably going to end up buying a buffer since i dont think anyone around here rents them out unless anyone from here is from CT and wants to give me a hand :D. From what i understand i would sand with 1000 and get the top of the orange peel knocked off. Then i would work up to 1500 to get it evened out, then sand it finer with 2000. Then trizact etc etc. I have 3 coats of nason select clear on it but i do worry about sanding thru while trying to get the orange peel off.

Also is this something that i shouldnt have a problem doing outside? Just wondering if small dust particles and such are going to ruin everything and make deep scratches. My main concern is starting this and never being able to get the paint to shine the same way or leaving swirls in the paint that wont come off. Im going to use the sure finish polish. Will a quart be enough to do a whole car?

Sorry for the questions just want to make sure i get everything right. also in what order should i use the buffing pads? The only thing is the car was just painted yesterday but i probably wont be able to buff till next week maybe even later. Will this pose a problem???

Len
06-09-2010, 11:16 PM
That sanding disk kit should do an entire car but you might want to pick up another ten of the 1500 grit disks just in case. Yes, use an interface pad with the Finishing Film.

After you finish with the 1500 dry sanding then the Trizact is used wet to remove the 1500 scratches.

The sander may do the job but you should have one with a 3/32" throw for optimum results. This throw is not absolutely necessary but it helps insure the best result. A 3/16" throw is also usable but I wouldn't turn a novice loose with a 3/8" machine at this stage of the work or the paint could easily get damaged.

psyclone07
06-14-2010, 08:05 PM
well i figure im going to do it by hand since its cheaper that route and i figure ill only be doing this a few times a year at most. I just recently bought a makita 9227c buffer and i ordered some Sure finish compound and some pads last night. I hope everything gets to me by the weekend :D

psyclone07
07-02-2010, 09:45 PM
well i got the pads and sure finish from len and decided to test it out on my old hood. I wetsanded with 1500 and then 2000 then gave it a buff. I went from the wool pad which seems to do well then to the black foam pad. Im having issues removing a lot of fine scatches is it because the black pad is too soft...and i should get a orange pad???? not too sure what else i could be doing wrong, practicing before i even get near my car.

Robert
07-02-2010, 10:25 PM
but this time, use the pad just on the edge of dry. Work the area until the scratches are gone then use the black pad just for swirl removal.

if you run into problems, call the number on the bottle between 8 and 5 Pacific daylight time.

Robert

Henry
07-03-2010, 02:30 AM
well i got the pads and sure finish from len and decided to test it out on my old hood. I wetsanded with 1500 and then 2000 then gave it a buff. I went from the wool pad which seems to do well then to the black foam pad. Im having issues removing a lot of fine scatches is it because the black pad is too soft...and i should get a orange pad???? not too sure what else i could be doing wrong, practicing before i even get near my car.

Unless your old hood is of new bc/cc paint you really can't use it as a test of colorsanding and buffing.
Now you need to be careful that your old hood did not contain nasty crap that is now in your pads.
Take your time on the new paint. It ain't a quick process but can go by smoothly. ONLY concentrate on about an 18 x 18 area or a square foot at a time. Do this for sanding until the entire panel is sanded. Be sure to change the paper as it needs to be and look at what you did with the surface as far as orange peel remaining.
No big deal if you don't get it all done in one day or do not get to buff. Just do it right and keep going.
Buff the same way in small sections at a time and keep working the buffing in where it needs and move on. DO NOT LET the pad get too dry.

Finally, buff OFF (OFF THE PANEL). If you don't know what that means then say so NOW. Henry

Robert
07-05-2010, 09:34 AM
I change the contact patch depending on the direction of travel of the machine. When I move the machine right to left my contact patch is between 11 and 3 with the direction of travel being from 3 to 9. Then, when I move left to right, I make the contact patch between about 10 and 2. This will leave a little trail of polish on the panel, then move the polisher down and pick up that trail of polish and wipe the panel clean - with the polisher. As long as you're leaving that residue trail there's enough polish on the WOOL pad.

Robert

dho
07-15-2010, 08:09 AM
Henry, what do you mean by buffing off the panel? I appreciate the knowledge ya'll share. I've learned a lot.

Buddy

Henry
07-15-2010, 10:49 AM
Henry, what do you mean by buffing off the panel? I appreciate the knowledge ya'll share. I've learned a lot.

Buddy

Buffers have a clockwise rotation. Always watching the rotation and where you are on the panel you need it to be second nature that the ROTATION (clockwise) is aimed OFF (at the end or edge) of the panel.

Try buffing AGAINST an old panel to see the difference and the unwanted result.

Robert's DVD is well put together and worth watching a few times.

AS WELL, get used to going to the HOME PAGE here (top of every page) and clicking on the CLASSROOM link where is tons of informationt that would take you many years to learn on your own (the hard way). Bring on more questions since we want your efforts to work out for you.

Lastly, I gave up wetsanding in favor of FinishFilm on the right DA. No wet mess, no scratching, work done very quickly with grits from 1200 to 3000. Hope you get to try this method. Henry

dho
07-17-2010, 08:16 AM
Thanks, Henry. I've got Robert's DVD, but I hadn't noticed the classroom link. I appreciate the expertise shared here.

dho

Henry
07-17-2010, 10:49 AM
Thanks, Henry. I've got Robert's DVD, but I hadn't noticed the classroom link. I appreciate the expertise shared here.

dho

from Robert. In it he talks about off the panel with the buffer and shows a lot of detail. The link below also came from the CLASSROOM:

http://www.autobodystore.com/rsw.shtml

Henry

Robert
07-18-2010, 08:43 AM
Have you tried the new triact 1500 finishing film? You use it with just a spritz of water so there's no dust and no pigtail. The only problem I found with it is that it seems to slice the paint so when I polish, it looks great but then as the paint tightens up, the slices open up and show the scratch.

I got around that by scraping the paper with the back of a knife - I have a big carving knife for cutting up sponge and I use the back of that - to knock the pins shaped abrasives down. The over all cutting is the same but I don't have the comeback problem anymore. Sort of like in the old days when we'd run our new paper against the old to make the cut more uniform.

So, on most jobs, 1500 followed by 3000 and buff works great - unless of course you're matching existing peel, then a very soft interface and a light touch with the 1500 - not a real cut - then 3000, ends the conversation.

All the best,
Robert

Henry
07-22-2010, 10:45 AM
Have you tried the new triact 1500 finishing film? You use it with just a spritz of water so there's no dust and no pigtail. The only problem I found with it is that it seems to slice the paint so when I polish, it looks great but then as the paint tightens up, the slices open up and show the scratch.

I got around that by scraping the paper with the back of a knife - I have a big carving knife for cutting up sponge and I use the back of that - to knock the pins shaped abrasives down. The over all cutting is the same but I don't have the comeback problem anymore. Sort of like in the old days when we'd run our new paper against the old to make the cut more uniform.

So, on most jobs, 1500 followed by 3000 and buff works great - unless of course you're matching existing peel, then a very soft interface and a light touch with the 1500 - not a real cut - then 3000, ends the conversation.

All the best,
Robert

Hi Robert and no I have not tried any of the new stuff most are using. I will one day and keep your skills and good advice in mind. Thanks. Henry

Bob K
07-22-2010, 01:36 PM
Henry, you’ve got to get a few Trizact Clear Coat Sanding Discs. Try them out, you will love them. I can’t say enough about them. They are surly the best thing since sliced bread. I use them a little more than damp. I have a wet sponge in one hand and my AirVantage in the other. I keep the surface wet, not flooded but wet for sure so I don’t get white paste building up from the sanded clear coat. I have a window washer with me like the kind you find at a gas station. Sand a short time and pull the water away with the squeegee side and you can immediately see how much sanding there is to go. It does go fast, and the discs last a long time.

http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=3M2088&Category_Code=M3

Bob K