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DaddyCat
05-14-2010, 08:47 AM
0- 1,750 rpm... I can buy this off craigs list for ~$100. My question is, are the rpms gonna be ok to polish my new clear coat? SPI Universal and not decided on polish compound but sure finish is most likely.
thanks guys!!
http://www.milwaukeetool.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductId=5460-6&CategoryName=SC%3A+Polishers

Robert
05-14-2010, 09:18 AM
emphasis on heavy. I have a friend who details cars who loved that machine until he tried my Makita. Seriously, if you're just starting out, the soft start of the Makita and the ability to run down to 600 rpms makes the difference a no brainer.

The Makita is easier to handle, lighter, has a wider range of rpms, and will, if you change out the cord give you years of trouble free service.

DaddyCat
05-14-2010, 10:00 AM
I guess you refer to the famous Makita BO6040, that's "unobtainium" on my budget Robert but thank you for your reply. Guess I'll keep looking and hoping. :redface:

Phil V
05-14-2010, 10:56 AM
Daddycat, That milwaukee buffer is a good buffer and would work well for your buffing and polishing needs. One or two pounds difference in weight between the Milwaukee and the Makita 9227C would be a non issue when used in a home shop environment. Some people like the slow start feature of the Makita and some don't. Either slow start or fast start would be fine for me. Both of those buffers (the Makita and the Milwaukee) sell for about the same money which is right near $200 new. You could expect to buy either in excellent used condition for around a hundred dollars.
If the two buffers were sitting next to each other, both in comparable good condition and both for a hundred dollars I would choose the Makita 9227C. I have had excellent service for all the Makita tools I have owned and the 9227C is no different which makes me a little biased towards Makita. Bottom line is either buffer would work good for you.

DaddyCat
05-14-2010, 01:00 PM
Thanks Phil,
9 lbs for the Milwaukee 5460, 6.5 lbs for Makita 9227 however the Makita BO6040 is only 6 lbs. with the option of random orbit with forced rotation which I understand is nice to have(more money too) . I may jump on the Milwaukee if I can't find a used Makita. This will be my first time painting and polishing a car and it's a small car, Acura Integra, I'm sure I can make the Milwaukee work without killing myself leaning over to reach. Can you say "isometrics"? :D

Robert
05-14-2010, 11:19 PM
The action of that machine is just better and the handle comes straight out so it doesn't tend to bang into the car as much. Also, if you're just learning, 600 rpms is very easy to control. The handle on the Makita, the loop, also gives you more options as your positions change. Overall, the Makita is a much easier to use machine. If you'd like to discuss it on the phone IM me your number and we can talk.

DaddyCat
05-15-2010, 08:46 AM
Thank you, I so appreciate the help. Robert I may take you up on the offer to speak with you in the near future. The guy with the Milwaukee 5460 never replied so I may buy the Makita kit from Len http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=MAK9227CX3&Category_Code=T2
I do have a couple questions, I see the Makita comes with a 7" hook and loop pad, wool bonnet and polishing pads. I'm alittle nervous about using the 7" because the Integra has so many curves and body lines. Is it possible to get the Makita with 6" hook n loop, wool and pads.
I also would like to know if a Qt of Sure Finish will be enough for the Integra?
Thanks again!
Photo of the Integra before QP repair, now in primer awaiting fresh paint. http://i787.photobucket.com/albums/yy158/DaddyCat_photos/Before.jpg

Len
05-15-2010, 09:20 AM
The Makita 9227 can be slowed to 600 RPM using the speed adjusting knob then you can slow the rotation even more by releasing the trigger slightly. You can get it down to 20 RPM if you get into a tricky situation. We use the Sure Finish 6" foam pads with the SF backing plate on almost everything, they work great. A quart of SF is plenty to do that car a couple of times when used correctly.

DaddyCat
05-15-2010, 10:02 AM
8) thanks Len! Are the wool and polishing pads that come with the Makita kit compatible with Sure Finish? Or do I need to spend another ~$40 on the 6" backing plate, 6.5" hd wool and an orange pad? One orange and one wool is enough or am I being too cheap? Just trying to get my shopping list right (and not buying things I don't need.)
This damn "restoration" is costing way more than a sane person would spend. :goof:

Dennis N. Schmidt
05-18-2010, 10:36 AM
I love the Milwaukee and I've got three of them. Two variable speed 0-1750 and one 1750 only. I've also got four Makita's and four Hitachi's which are pretty much identical to the Makita's except they have a crappier speed control.

But, the reason I like the Milwaukee best is the nature of what I do which is polish furniture. Furniture, when I polish it, is horizontal and the additional weight is a blessing as it speeds things up. From the standpoint of raw power the Milwaukee is the best.

If I was holding it on the side of a car I'd like it less.

DaddyCat
05-18-2010, 12:10 PM
Thank you Dennis, I always love to hear peoples opinions! I'm looking more and more at the Makita BO6040 and wonder if it can be used to remove paint? I know it's a sweet polisher but I have a 1948 Studebaker Pickup that will need old paint removed from the front fenders and hood only. Can it do both? (polish and remove old paint)

This seems to have become a "tools" thread though I was asking about tools for the "final touch" (untill now). So if you wanna move it Len, I understand.

Thanks Guys !!

Dennis N. Schmidt
05-18-2010, 09:50 PM
The BO6040 is a sander that because of it's dual action capability is a good finish polisher. It will not compound for you. It's more or less a swirl remover.

It can remove paint very effectively but so too can a rotary polisher with an 8" pad and 8" 80 grit paper at slow speed and this is probably the best way to do it as the shearing action of the low speed prevents the paper from loading up.

DaddyCat
05-19-2010, 08:27 AM
Thanks Dennis, I guess I'm terrified of the damage I could do with a rotary polisher. I know to tape edges, keep the tool moving and have the pad tilted alittle to exit edges/body lines. But I belive the Makita BO6040 would be a safer tool in the hands of an amature like myself.
After base and clear I will color sand with 3M 1500 Finish Film and 3M 3000 Trizact on an AirVantage then polish with Sure Finish (on what ever polisher I decide on). What did you mean Dennis that the Makita BO6040 will "not compound"?
Another question I have is how to polish small areas like roof pillars, places the tool can't reach? If hand polishing is too slow to cut/polish how is it done?

Phil V
05-19-2010, 11:57 AM
Several people have told you what the best buffer to buy is based on your needs. You keep coming up with excuses not to take their advice. Go buy that little orbital sander and be done with it. It will do a piss poor job of buffing out your project but apparently you already have yourself talked into it. Good Grief !

88GT
05-19-2010, 12:48 PM
emphasis on heavy. I have a friend who details cars who loved that machine until he tried my Makita. Seriously, if you're just starting out, the soft start of the Makita and the ability to run down to 600 rpms makes the difference a no brainer.

The Makita is easier to handle, lighter, has a wider range of rpms, and will, if you change out the cord give you years of trouble free service.

My pneumatic tough mechanics $125 brand new buffer can go down to about 100 rpm :)
Its light weight and super controlable. I'll never go back to electric.

DaddyCat
05-19-2010, 01:29 PM
Several people have told you what the best buffer to buy is based on your needs. You keep coming up with excuses not to take their advice. Go buy that little orbital sander and be done with it. It will do a piss poor job of buffing out your project but apparently you already have yourself talked into it. Good Grief !

Wow Phil who pissed in your coffee? No one before your reply said the Makita BO6040 was not capable of polishing after color sanding. So I thank you for that info. Several did say they recomend rotary polishers, all highly experienced men and I respect that advice. I thought Robert prefered the Makita B06040 and Len likes forced rotation but uses an air tool with forced rotation for polishing.

88GT thanks but my compressor only puts out 11 cfm/90 lbs, ok for my little AirVantage...

88GT
05-19-2010, 03:10 PM
Wow Phil who pissed in your coffee? No one before your reply said the Makita BO6040 was not capable of polishing after color sanding. So I thank you for that info. Several did say they recomend rotary polishers, all highly experienced men and I respect that advice. I thought Robert prefered the Makita B06040 and Len likes forced rotation but uses an air tool with forced rotation for polishing.

88GT thanks but my compressor only puts out 11 cfm/90 lbs, ok for my little AirVantage...

they are air hogs. You could do it with intermittent work. A random orbit machine wont get the job done. Dont fear the rotary machine. 3000 grit scratches will be easy to polish out, but not with a random orbit

Dennis N. Schmidt
05-21-2010, 02:08 PM
To answer your specific question to me the BO6040 will not remove sandpaper scratches at least not as fast as a rotary buffer. It's fantastic at removing swirl marks which is what Robert and I use it for. It's also amazing in forced rotation mode when used with P3000 Trizact. It's a job specific tool for a specific purpose.

DaddyCat
05-21-2010, 02:44 PM
Thank you Dennis, this is the first person experience with the BO6040 I was hoping to hear about. If you read this ad I saw for the tool you'll understand why I thought it could do both, random orbit and rotary.





"Two polishing modes in one exceptional machine!


Electric polishers are broken down into two categories: dual action and circular. The dual-action machines are best for novice detailers because there is no risk of damaging the paint. The random motion of the pad makes them great for applying waxes and polishes without swirls or scratching. Circular polishers are great for removing scratches but require some expertise to use them properly. Circular models are the problem-solvers. Most enthusiasts keep one of each around to handle any detailing task. Fortunately, Makita makes the BO6040 Dual-Action Polisher, an ingenious polisher that works as a circular polisher or a dual-action polisher.

An orange knob on the Makita Polisher makes it possible to switch back and forth between dual-action and circular motion. Just be sure the machine is off when you make the switch. The speed control on the back of the machine allows you to operate at anywhere from 1600 to 5800 opm, no matter what mode you are in. Use the dual-action mode for gentle polish and wax application, and buffing. Use the circular motion for compounding and scratch removal. One machine does it all!

Best of all, when the Makita BO6040 is in circular mode, it still jiggles like the dual-action motion. This lessens the risk of producing swirls while still giving you the cutting power of a circular polisher. You should still take great care when operating the machine in the circular setting by starting at a low speed. We recommend 2 opm until you are more comfortable.

The Makita BO6040 comes with a one year factory warranty and a handy carrying case. It also comes with a wrench to remove the included 6” Hook & Loop backing plate.

The Makita BO6040 replaces two machines, making a great value. If you do not currently own a buffer, or you are not sure if your vehicle’s scratches will come out with an ordinary dual-action polisher, this is an excellent choice. Start out with the dual-action setting and a low-cut polish. The general rule is if your fingernail catches the scratch, you’ll need to do some compounding to totally remove it. If the dual-action is not working, just turn the machine off, turn the orange knob, and turn the polisher back on. The forced circular motion will cut the scratch down until it is completely eliminated.

Circular polishing requires some know-how. If you are a beginner, polish in the company of a skilled detailer. While the Makita BO6040 is a great machine to learn on, you still need to take precautions to avoid swirling.

If you only buy one polisher, make it the Makita BO6040 Dual-Action Polisher. This one machine will take care of all your detailing jobs, large or small, with just the turn of a knob.



2-mode switch for "random orbit" action (finish sanding) and "random orbit with forced rotation" action (aggressive sanding and polishing)

Superior engineering and design reduces vibration by 20% and noise levels almost 2 to 1 over the competition

Variable speed control dial (1,600 - 5,800 OPM; 180 - 670 RPM) for various applications

Compact tool height (5-3/16") increases efficiency and maneuverability

Small diameter barrel grip for optimum comfort and control
Uses convenient hook & loop abrasive sanding discs and accessories (hook & loop backing plate included)

Efficient through-the-pad dust collection system with built in dust port for a cleaner work environment

Includes: 1 ea. Abrasive Disc (#120; 794610-1), Hex Wrench (783203-8), Rubber Pad (193286-4), Wrench Holder (410047-0) and Plastic Tool Case (824591-5) "